Vaccines available at the Medical Center

|

Make sure you bring along your health booklet (carnet de santé) or immunization record (carnet de vaccinations) if you have one.

For children, no vaccinations can be administered without:

  • the written permission of their parents or legal guardian;
  • an identity document belonging to their parents or legal guardian.

    CHICKENPOX

    (NOT AVAILABLE)
     
    Recommendations

    Adolescents aged between 12 and 18 who have no clinical history of chickenpox or are unsure of their clinical history; in this case a prior blood test can be performed.

    The vaccine

    The vaccine is made from the live attenuated virus.
    This vaccine is not available at the vaccination center.

    Specialty vaccines available at the vaccination center

    This vaccine is not available at the center.

    Find out more

    The disease

    Chickenpox is a highly contagious eruptive disease that is common in children. It is caused by a virus transmitted by inhaling airborne respiratory droplets of saliva from an infected person or through direct contact with the skin rash. 


    DIPHTHERIA

    Recommendations

    Consult the vaccination schedule.
    For travelers: vaccination should be systematically updated.

    The vaccine

    The vaccine is made from a toxic substance that is produced by the bacteria and causes the symptoms. The toxin is treated with formaldehyde and heat until it becomes harmless.
    It is always given in combination with the tetanus and polio vaccines, and can also be combined with the whooping cough vaccine and sometimes also the vaccines against invasive infections with Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) and hepatitis B.

    Specialty vaccines available at the vaccination center

    REVAXIS®: Diphtheria (reduced dose), tetanus, polio
    BOOSTRIX®: Diphtheria (reduced dose), tetanus, polio, whooping cough (acellular vaccine)
    REPEVAX®: Diphtheria (reduced dose), tetanus, polio, whooping cough (acellular vaccine)

    Vaccination schedule

    Consult the vaccination schedule.
    See the vaccination price list.

    Find out more

    The disease

    Diphtheria is caused by Corynebacterium diphtheriae bacteria.
    The symptoms are a sore throat with a characteristic gray coating known as a pseudomembrane, which can lead to complications such as respiratory paralysis, causing death by asphyxiation.
    It is spread by droplets of infected saliva.

    Risks for travelers

    Diphtheria has now virtually disappeared in industrialized countries, where in the past there were deadly outbreaks. But it still occurs in many developing countries.
    Russia and the former Soviet states experienced a major outbreak in the early 1990s; it is now in decline following mass vaccination campaigns among the populations of these countries, but the rise in travel to and from Eastern Europe means that Western countries are still at risk of a potential outbreak.
     
    The epidemiological situation in France
    Recent studies conducted in France and several other Western countries have demonstrated insufficient vaccination coverage among the adult population, especially those over 65, two-thirds of whom are not protected or not sufficiently protected against the disease.
     


    HEPATITIS A

    Recommendations

    For travelers: any period of time spent in countries with low levels of hygiene.
     
    Vaccination is particularly recommended for people who have chronic infection with hepatitis B or hepatitis C.
     
    Those born before 1945 or who spent their childhood in a developing country will generally have natural protection. In this case, a blood test can be performed to detect the presence of protective antibodies and avoid unnecessary vaccination.
    However, from a medical viewpoint there is no danger in vaccinating someone who has already been immunized.
     Sources: BEH: 2017 Health Recommendations for Travelers

    The vaccine

    The vaccine is made from the inactivated (killed) virus.

    Specialty vaccines available at the vaccination center

    TWINRIX® Adult (combined hepatitis A + hepatitis B vaccine)

    Vaccination schedule

    A first dose at least two weeks before traveling.
    A booster 6 to 12 months later: this second dose can be administered up to 3 or 5 years after the first dose, depending on the vaccine used. Protection lasts for at least 10 years. See the vaccination price list.

    Find out more

    The disease

    Hepatitis A is caused by a virus transmitted through water and food that has been contaminated with feces. Symptoms include digestive problems and jaundice (yellowing of the skin).
     
    Unlike hepatitis B, hepatitis A does not cause chronic disease, but there are severe fulminant forms which lead to widespread destruction of liver cells and are usually fatal in the absence of a liver transplant.

    Risks for travelers

    Like all fecal-oral diseases, hepatitis A is widespread in developing countries.


    HEPATITIS B

    Recommendations

    Consult the vaccination schedule.
    For travelers, this vaccination is recommended for long stays or travel involving high-risk activities in developing countries with a high prevalence of infection.

    The vaccine

    The vaccine is made from a hepatitis B surface particle, obtained synthetically using genetic engineering techniques.

    Specialty vaccines available at the vaccination center

    ENGERIX B20®: Hepatitis B (adult),
    Engerix B10 (child)
    TWINRIX® Adult (combined hepatitis A + hepatitis B vaccine)
    TWINRIX® Child (combined hepatitis A + hepatitis B vaccine)

    Vaccination schedule

    Consult the vaccination schedule.
    See the vaccination price list.

    Find out more

    The disease

    Hepatitis B is caused by a virus that proliferates in liver cells. Infection may lead to digestive problems and jaundice (yellowing of the skin), though many people do not experience any symptoms. The severity of the disease lies in the risk of later complications, namely cirrhosis and liver disease.
     
    The virus is spread from one person to another through contact with blood (transfusion, use of needles or dirty medical equipment) or through sexual contact or intimate family contact (such as between a mother and her child).

    Risks for travelers

    Hepatitis B is frequent in developing countries but much rarer in industrialized countries.
    In France, where the disease is most often spread through sexual contact, adolescents are most at risk of infection.
     
    To achieve the World Health Organization's target of eliminating the disease completely, as many people as possible should be vaccinated.
    Hepatitis B vaccination is therefore included in the vaccination schedule for children from the age of 2 months.


    INFLUENZA

    Recommendations

    See the vaccination price list.

    The vaccine

    The vaccine is prepared from inactivated viruses cultured in chicken embryos; its composition changes each year depending on the viral strains circulating at any one time, which can be highly variable.
    Several reference centers across the world are constantly monitoring the emergence of new viral strains.

    Specialty vaccines available at the vaccination center

    VAXIGRIP®

    Vaccination schedule

    One dose each year in the fall.
    See the vaccination price list.

    Find out more

    The disease

    Although influenza is a familiar disease, it is not as harmless as generally thought; it can lead to severe complications, especially in elderly or weak patients.

    Risks for travelers

    Influenza infection is highly contagious and can quickly spread throughout a country, a continent or even the entire world; in this case it is referred to as a pandemic.


    JAPANESE ENCEPHALITIS

    Recommendations

    Vaccination is recommended from 2 months (half dose between 2 months and 3 years) for those spending time in endemic areas (see: Opinion from the French High Council for Public Health (HCSP) of September 20, 2013 on the recommendation for vaccination against Japanese encephalitis).
     
    Sources:

    The vaccine

    The vaccine is made from the inactivated (killed) virus.

    Specialty vaccines available at the vaccination center

    IXIARO®

    Vaccination schedule

    • 2 doses 28 days apart.
    • Booster: 12 to 24 months after the first dose.

    Those at constant risk of infection with Japanese encephalitis (laboratory staff or those living in an endemic area) should receive a booster dose 12 months after primary immunization.

    See the vaccination price list.

    Find out more

    The disease

    Japanese encephalitis is an arbovirus* spread through bites from Culex mosquitoes, which are widespread near rice fields. It is caused by a virus that results in lesions in the central nervous system and can lead to death (there is a high fatality rate) or leave survivors with severe neuropsychiatric symptoms.
     
    (*) short for arthropod-borne virus – a disease caused by a virus transmitted by arthropod bites or stings.

    Risks for travelers

    The disease is prevalent in South-East Asia, China and the Indian subcontinent.
    The risks are low when going to major tourist spots; they are higher at night in rural areas (especially near rice fields) in the rainy season.
    The animal reservoir of the virus includes a variety of species that can be domestic animals, especially pigs, as well as wild animals such as migratory birds.

     


    LEPTOSPIROSIS

    Recommendations

    Consult the vaccination schedule.

    The vaccine

    The vaccine is made of inactivated whole bacteria. It is a monovalent vaccine containing just one serogroup, L. icterohaemorrhagiae.

    Specialty vaccines available at the vaccination center

    SPIROLEPT®

    Vaccination schedule

    • 2 doses 2 weeks apart
    • Booster: 6 months later, then every 2 years.

    See the vaccination price list.

    Find out more

    The disease

    Leptospirosis is caused by Leptospira bacteria from a number of species, some of which are pathogenic for many mammals including humans.
    The disease is spread through contact, either direct or more often indirect (fresh water, mud), with the urine of infected animals (rodents).

    Risks

    This disease has a low incidence in France but is widespread in South-East Asia (Indonesia), Reunion Island, New Caledonia, Tahiti and along the Pacific coast of South America.


    MEASLES

     

    Recommendations
    Consult the vaccination schedule.

    For travelers: this vaccine can be administered from the age of 6 months if necessary, with a dose of monovalent measles vaccine between 6 and 11 months.
    Children who have received the monovalent measles vaccine should subsequently be given the two doses of trivalent MMR vaccine according to the vaccination schedule.
    Adult travelers born after 1980 should have received two doses of the MMR vaccine.

    The vaccine

    The live attenuated virus vaccine is available as a monovalent or trivalent vaccine, the latter combined with the mumps and rubella vaccines.

    Specialty vaccines available at the vaccination center 

    ROUVAX®
    PRIORIX® (trivalent vaccine: measles-mumps-rubella)

    Vaccination schedule

    Consult the vaccination schedule.
    See the vaccination price list.

    Find out more

    The desease

    Measles is an eruptive disease caused by a virus spread through the air or by direct contact. Although often thought of as harmless, it can lead to extremely severe respiratory or neurological complications.

     

     

    MENINGOCOCCAL MENINGITIS

    Recommendations

    See the vaccination schedule. and the 2017 Health Recommendations for Travelers.
    For travelers, vaccination is recommended for people who will be staying* in a region that has been affected by an outbreak.

    (*) Especially a lengthy stay in direct contact with the local population.

    A certificate of vaccination with the tetravalent (preferably conjugate) A, C, Y and W-135 vaccine dated less than three years and more than 10 days before travel is required for pilgrims visiting Mecca.
     

    Specialty vaccines available at the vaccination center

    • VACCIN MENINGOCOCCIQUE A + C® (from 6 months)
    • MENJUGATEKIT®: meningococcal C conjugate vaccine (from 2 months)
    • NIMENRIX®: meningococcal tetravalent conjugate vaccine for groups A, C, Y and W-135 (from 1 year)

    Vaccination schedule

    • One dose 10 days before traveling
    • Protection: 3 years

    See the vaccination price list.

    Find out more

    The disease

    Meningitis is caused by the bacterium Neisseria meningitidis (known as meningococcus), which attacks the protective membranes or "meninges" of the central nervous system. Symptoms include fever, severe headaches and a stiff neck. Meningitis is a severe disease that can lead to death in just a few hours. It is spread from one person to another by droplets of saliva.

    Risks

    There are three main meningococcal groups: A, B and C. Meningococcal serogroup A, and to a lesser extent serogroup C, are responsible for deadly outbreaks that regularly occur in the Sahel region of Africa in the dry season. Other regions of the globe can also be periodically affected. Recent years have seen the emergence of serogroup W-135.
     


    MUMPS

    Recommendations

    Consult the vaccination schedule.

    The vaccine

    The vaccine is a live attenuated vaccine. It is only available in France as a trivalent vaccine, combined with the measles and rubella vaccines.

    Specialty vaccines available at the vaccination center

    PRIORIX® (trivalent vaccine: measles-mumps-rubella)

    Vaccination schedule

    Consult the vaccination schedule.
    See the vaccination price list.

    Find out more

    The desease

    Mumps is caused by an airborne virus. The disease is usually characterized by parotitis (an inflammation of one of the salivary glands). It can occasionally also affect the central nervous system (meningitis, encephalitis) and the reproductive glands (ovaries, testicles).


    POLIOMYELITIS

    Recommendations

    Consult the vaccination schedule.
    For all travelers, regardless of their destination.

    The vaccine

    The vaccine used in France is an inactivated injectable vaccine, in other words one in which the virus has been killed. An oral vaccine made of live attenuated virus strains also exists but is no longer recommended in France except in the event of an outbreak, since it may (though the chances are exceedingly slim) cause paralysis in those receiving it or people they are in close contact with. It is available as a monovalent vaccine or combined with the diphtheria and tetanus vaccines, sometimes also including the whooping cough vaccine and vaccines against invasive infections with Haemophilus influenzae type B (Hib) and hepatitis B.

    Specialty vaccines available at the vaccination center

    • REVAXIS®: Diphtheria (reduced dose), tetanus, polio
    • BOOSTRIX®: Diphtheria (reduced dose), tetanus, polio, whooping cough (acellular vaccine)
    • REPEVAX®: Diphtheria (reduced dose), tetanus, polio, whooping cough (acellular vaccine)

    Vaccination schedule

    Consult the vaccination schedule.
    See the vaccination price list.

    Find out more

    The disease

    Poliomyelitis (usually referred to as polio), caused by a virus that attacks the spinal cord, is characterized by a varying degree of paralysis that can result in permanent disability if it affects the lower limbs. It can also be life-threatening if it attacks the respiratory muscles or nervous system. The virus is spread through contact with an infected person, but seemingly healthy people can also excrete the virus in their stools. Polio can also be spread through direct contact (with hands) or by drinking or bathing in contaminated water.

    Risks for travelers

    Contrary to popular belief, polio can strike at any age. While the disease has been eradicated in France and other industrialized countries and on the entire American continent, it is still prevalent in a number of countries in Africa and Asia, despite the progress made with mass vaccination campaigns. Non-immunized adults run the risk of developing a paralytic form of the disease.


    RABIES

     Recommendations

     For travelers: preventive vaccination against rabies is recommended for expatriates and travelers who will be staying for lengthy or repeated spells or in isolated conditions in regions where rabies is widespread.
     
    IMPORTANT: preventive vaccination does not rule out the need for curative treatment, which should be given as soon as possible in the event of contact (a bite, scratch or lick to a wound or mucosa) from a rabid or suspected rabid animal. The advantage of preventive vaccination is that it simplifies post-exposure treatment:

    • It removes the need for serum therapy, since the booster doses soon provide a sufficient level of antibodies. This is particularly important in regions where immunoglobulin (which is expensive and rare) is not available.
    • 2 doses 3 days apart are sufficient, instead of the 4 to 5 doses usually given as post-exposure prophylaxis.

     Sources: BEH: 2017 Health Recommendations for Travelers

    The vaccine

    The vaccine is prepared from an inactivated (killed) virus.

    Specialty vaccines available at the vaccination center

    VACCIN RABIQUE PASTEUR® (grown on Vero cells).

    Vaccination schedule (pre-exposure)

    • 3 intramuscular doses in the deltoid on days 0, 7, 21 or 28.
    • Children: recommended for young children as soon as they can walk.

    See the vaccination price list.

    Find out more

    The disease

    Rabies is a disease that is always fatal. It is caused by a neurotropic virus which attacks the nervous system and causes encephalitis in mammals. There are two clinical forms: furious rabies and paralytic (or dumb) rabies.

    Risks for travelers

    Rabies is widespread across the world. Dogs are the main vector of rabies, but it can be transmitted by all mammals. The virus is present in the animal's saliva. While traveling it can sometimes be difficult to find a curative vaccine that is effective and well tolerated.


     

     

    RUBELLA

    Recommendations

    Consult the vaccination schedule.

    The vaccine

    The live attenuated virus vaccine is available as a trivalent vaccine combined with the measles and mumps vaccines.

    Specialty vaccines available at the vaccination center

    PRIORIX® (trivalent vaccine: measles-mumps-rubella)

    Vaccination schedule

    Consult the vaccination schedule.
    See the vaccination price list.

    Find out more

    The desease

    Rubella is an eruptive disease caused by a virus transmitted by the respiratory route. It is generally mild in children but if contracted during pregnancy it can lead to fetal defects.


    TETANUS

    Recommendations

    Consult the vaccination schedule.
    For travelers: vaccination should be systematically updated.

    The vaccine

    The vaccine is made from a toxic substance that is produced by the bacteria and causes the symptoms. The toxin is treated with formaldehyde and heat until it becomes harmless. It is available as a monovalent vaccine or in combination with the diphtheria and polio vaccines. It may also be combined with the whooping cough vaccine and vaccines against invasive infections with Haemophilus influenzae type B (Hib) and hepatitis B.

    Specialty vaccines available at the vaccination center

    • REVAXIS®: Diphtheria (reduced dose), tetanus, polio
    • BOOSTRIX®: Diphtheria (reduced dose), tetanus, polio, whooping cough (acellular vaccine)
    • REPEVAX®: Diphtheria (reduced dose), tetanus, polio, whooping cough (acellular vaccine)
    • VACCIN TETANIQUE PASTEUR®: Tetanus

    Vaccination schedule

    Consult the vaccination schedule.
    See the vaccination price list.

    Find out more

    The disease

    Tetanus is caused by Clostridium tetani bacteria, which produce a toxin that affects the nervous system, leading to violent muscle spasms that can result in death through paralysis of the respiratory muscles. These bacteria are found in soil.

    Risks and immunization coverage in France

    The risk of contracting tetanus is not increased by traveling outside France, but a trip abroad is a good opportunity to make sure you are up to date with this vaccination, which is often neglected in adulthood. Many older people (especially women) have never been vaccinated against tetanus.


    TICK-BORNE ENCEPHALITIS
     
    Recommendations

    Vaccination is recommended for those staying in rural areas (camping, hiking, etc.) in affected regions, in Central, Northern and Eastern Europe, northerly parts of Central Asia, China and Japan, from spring to fall.
    Sources: BEH: 2017 Health Recommendations for Travelers

    The vaccine

    The vaccine is composed of an inactivated (killed) virus.

    Specialty vaccines available at the vaccination center

    Encepur® 0.5ml (adults and children over 12)

    Vaccination schedule

    Three doses, with doses 2 and 3 administered 1 to 3 months and 9 to 12 months respectively after the initial dose.
    First booster: 3 years after the last dose.
     
    Accelerated schedule
    Three doses, with doses 2 and 3 administered after 7 and 21 days (in which case the first booster should be given 12 to 18 months after primary immunization).

    See the vaccination price list.

    Find out more

    The disease

    This disease is an arbovirus* transmitted by tick bites. It is caused by a virus that results in lesions in the central nervous system.
     
    (*) short for arthropod-borne virus – a disease caused by a virus transmitted by arthropod bites or stings.

    Risks for travelers

    This disease can be found in its Western form (Central European tick-borne encephalitis) in all European countries except the Benelux countries and the Iberian Peninsula. Its eastern form extends through Siberia (Russian spring-summer encephalitis), reaching the northerly part of Central Asia and north China and Japan.
    Travelers may be exposed to tick bites during open-air activities such as camping, hiking, etc.
    In addition to vaccination, travelers should wear insecticide-treated clothes that cover their skin and apply repellents to exposed areas.
    The disease can also be caught by consuming unpasteurized goat's milk.

     

    TUBERCULOSIS 

    Recommendations

    Consult the vaccination schedule.

    The vaccine

    The vaccine, developed by Calmette and Guérin (BCG), is derived from an attenuated live bovine tuberculosis bacillus.

    Specialty vaccines available at the vaccination center

    BCG BIOMED-LUBLIN® vaccine

    Vaccination schedule

    Children: consult the vaccination schedule.
    See the vaccination price list.

    Find out more

    The disease

    Tuberculosis, caused by Koch's bacillus, is still widespread across the world, especially in developing countries; in recent years it has also been on the rise again in industrialized countries, particularly in people with HIV and among disadvantaged populations.


    TYPHOID

     Recommendations

    • For travelers who will be staying for a lengthy period or in poor conditions in a country where the disease is endemic, especially in the Indian subcontinent. This does not rule out the need to adopt basic hygiene measures (hand washing is particularly vital). Sources: BEH – 2016 Health Recommendations for Travelers
    • Work-related risks: see the vaccination schedule

    The vaccine

    The vaccine is made of a molecule that composes the bacterial capsule.

    Specialty vaccines available at the vaccination center

    TYPHIM VI®

    Vaccination schedule

    • A first dose 2 weeks before traveling
    • Protection: 3 years
    • Children: from age 2

    See the vaccination price list.

    Find out more

    The disease

    Typhoid fever is caused by Salmonella typhi bacteria, transmitted by water and food that have been contaminated by feces. It is a severe disease characterized by a high temperature and a confused state, and may result in complications such as intestinal hemorrhage or perforations.

    Risks for travelers

    This disease has become rare but is still frequent in developing countries with poor sanitary conditions where typhoid, like all fecal-oral diseases, is endemic. The geographical distribution of the disease is the same as for hepatitis A, but there are regions at higher risk, especially India and North Africa.


    WHOOPING COUGH 

    Recommendations

    Consult the vaccination schedule.

    The vaccine

    This is an acellular vaccine composed of purified bacterial proteins.
    It is always given in combination with the tetanus, diphtheria and polio vaccines, and can also be combined with the vaccines against invasive infections with Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) and hepatitis B.
    The whole-cell vaccine is no longer available in France.

    Specialty vaccines available at the vaccination center

    BOOSTRIX®: Diphtheria (reduced dose), tetanus, polio, whooping cough (acellular vaccine)
    REPEVAX®: Diphtheria (reduced dose), tetanus, polio, whooping cough (acellular vaccine)

    Vaccination schedule

    Consult the vaccination schedule.
    See the vaccination price list.

    Find out more

    The disease

    Whooping cough, also known as pertussis, is a highly contagious disease caused by Bordetella pertussis bacteria that infect the respiratory tract. Whooping cough is an airborne disease that is transmitted through direct contact with infected people. Previously thought of as a childhood disease, whooping cough can in fact be severe for those of any age, but it is particularly dangerous and potentially fatal for babies under the age of 6 months.

    Risks, the epidemiological situation in France

    For non-vaccinated populations around the world, whooping cough remains a major public health concern that causes around 300,000 deaths each year. In countries where widespread vaccination was introduced more than thirty years ago, such as Australia, Belgium, Canada, Finland, France, the Netherlands and the United States, the number of cases has fallen significantly, but we are currently witnessing a change in the way the disease is spread, mainly as a result of children not being given the booster after 18 months. Unlike in the pre-vaccine era, whooping cough is no longer passed on just from one child to another, but also from adolescents and adults to newborns. Booster vaccinations were not previously recommended because of a potential increase in side effects caused by repeated vaccinations with whole-cell vaccines. For this reason, a late booster for those aged 11-13 was recommended as soon as subunit or acellular whooping cough vaccines became available (vaccines composed of purified bacterial proteins rather than inactivated, or killed, whole bacteria). Since October 2004, in France, a booster is also recommended for young parents, adults at risk and healthcare workers in contact with newborn babies.


    YELLOW FEVER

    Recommendations

    For those traveling to intertropical regions in Africa or South America.
    In accordance with the International Health Regulations, some countries may request a yellow fever vaccination certificate upon entry. But even if not mandatory, this vaccination is highly recommended when traveling to a yellow fever endemic region.
     
    Yellow fever vaccination should be avoided at all stages of pregnancy. However, given the severity of the disease, if the trip cannot be postponed, the vaccine can nevertheless be administered.
     
    Please note: for several countries in these regions, vaccination of travelers from non-endemic countries is not compulsory, despite the high risks of contracting the disease. You should observe the recommendations of an international vaccination center or see the Country-specific recommendations section on our website.

    The vaccine

    The vaccine is made from the attenuated live virus cultured in chicken embryos.

    Specialty vaccines available at the vaccination center

    STAMARIL®

    In France, only centers accredited by the Ministry of Health are authorized to administer yellow fever vaccinations.

    List of yellow fever vaccination centers 

    Vaccination schedule

    • Systematically: 1 injection at least 10 days before traveling; protection is lifelong* except for the cases outlined below**.
    • For children: from 9 months (between 6 and 9 months only in special circumstances).

    Vaccine only available at international vaccination centers. NB: a yellow fever vaccination certificate is required from all travelers entering the country.
     
    * Following a World Health Organization decision, the International Health Regulations have been amended and the term of validity of a yellow fever vaccination certificate, previously 10 years, has now been extended to the life of the person vaccinated.
    (See WHO International Travel and Health – List of countries, territories and areas); the ten-yearly boosters previously required under the International Health Regulations are therefore no longer necessary.
    ** According to the Opinion of the French High Council for Public Health (HCSP) (see BEH: 2017 Health Recommendations for Travelers), yellow fever booster vaccinations are still recommended for:

    • children who were vaccinated under the age of 2: a second dose from the age of 6 in the event of further travel to a yellow fever endemic region;
    • women whose primary vaccination was during pregnancy;
    • people with HIV;
    • immunodeficient patients vaccinated in the conditions outlined in the report by the French High Council for Public Health (HCSP): a second dose 10 years later;
    • people who were vaccinated against yellow fever more than 10 years ago: a second dose if an outbreak has been reported in the country visited.

    Vaccination price list

    Find out more

    The disease

    Yellow fever is an arbovirus* transmitted by Aedes or Haemagogus mosquitoes and caused by the yellow fever virus.
    This severe disease is characterized by hemorrhaging and jaundice (yellowing of the skin). It has a high death rate.
     
    (*) short for arthropod-borne virus – a disease caused by a virus transmitted by arthropod bites or stings.



    Afaq iso 9001 - Institut Pasteur


     

    Subscribe to our newsletter

    Back to top