Vaccination Schedule

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FROM BIRTH

Tuberculosis

The BCG vaccine is strongly recommended from birth for children exposed to a high risk of tuberculosis.

The BCG can be administered to unvaccinated children at risk up to the age of 15.


2 MONTHS

Diphtheriatetanuswhooping coughpoliomyelitis (polio), invasive infections with Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib)

  • First dose

Hepatitis B

  • First dose

Vaccination against hepatitis B is recommended as a priority for newborn infants.

A catch-up vaccination is recommended up to the age of 15 for children that have not been vaccinated.

Invasive pneumococcal infections

  • First dose

An anti-pneumococcal vaccination with the 13-valent conjugate vaccine is strongly recommended for all children under the age of 2. Two doses are administered one month apart and a booster dose at the age of 11 months.


4 MONTHS

Diphtheria, tetanus, whooping cough, poliomyelitis (polio), invasive infections with Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib)

  • Second dose

Hepatitis B

  • Second dose

Vaccination against hepatitis B is recommended as a priority for newborn infants.

Invasive pneumococcal infections

  • Second dose

An anti-pneumococcal vaccination with the 13-valent conjugate vaccine is recommended for all children under the age of 2. Two doses are administered one month apart and a booster dose at the age of 11 months.


11 MONTHS

Diphtheria, tetanus, whooping cough, poliomyelitis (polio), invasive infections with Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib)

  • First booster

Hepatitis B

  • Booster

Vaccination against hepatitis B is recommended as a priority for newborn infants.

Invasive pneumococcal infections

  • Booster

12 MONTHS

Invasive meningococcal infections

Measles, mumps, rubella

The full vaccination comprises two doses:

  • the first dose at 12 months,
  • the second dose between 16 and 18 months.

For infants that need to travel, the measles vaccine can be administered from the age of 6 months, with a dose of monovalent measles vaccine between 6 and 11 months. Children who have had the monovalent measles vaccine should subsequently be given the two doses of trivalent MMR vaccine according to the vaccination schedule.

Invasive meningococcal infections

Vaccination with the meningococcal C conjugate vaccine is systematically recommended for all children aged between 12 and 24 months.

  • 1 dose

The extension of this systematic vaccination with a dose of meningococcal C conjugate vaccine is currently recommended up to the age of 24.


BETWEEN 16 AND 18 MONTHS

Measles, mumps, rubella

  • Second dose

6 YEARS OLD

Diphtheria, tetanus, whooping cough, poliomyelitis (polio)

  • Second booster

BETWEEN 11 AND 13 YEARS OLD

Diphtheria*, tetanus, whooping cough*, poliomyelitis (polio)

  • Third booster

*with a vaccine containing reduced doses of diphtheria toxoid and whooping cough antigen.


BETWEEN 11 AND 14 YEARS OLD

Human papillomavirus (HPV) infections

Vaccination is recommended for all girls between the age of 11 and 14: two doses six months apart.

A catch-up program is designed for girls between 15 and 19 who have not yet been vaccinated.


UP TO 15 YEARS OLD

Hepatitis B

Via a catch-up program, if the vaccination has not yet been administered:

  • 3 doses: the first two 1 month apart with a booster 6 months after the first.
  • 2 doses at least 6 months apart, with one of the two approved vaccines for this indication (ENGERIX B® 20 μg or GENHEVAC B® Pasteur 20 μg), in the absence of a high risk of infection by the hepatitis B virus.

AFTER 18 YEARS OLD

Diphtheria*, tetanus, poliomyelitis (polio)

*with a vaccine containing a reduced dose of diphtheria toxoid.

Boosters are now recommended at age 25, 45 and 65, then every 10 years from age 65.

Whooping cough*

1 (single) dose* with a quadrivalent vaccine containing reduced doses of diphtheria toxoid and whooping cough antigen for the booster at age 25 if the person has not been vaccinated since the age of 5; a catch-up vaccine can be administered up to age 39.

Measles, mumps, rubella

People born after 1980 should have received a total of two doses of trivalent vaccine at least one month apart, regardless of their medical history concerning the three diseases.

Influenza

From age 65, an annual influenza vaccination is systematically recommended for the entire population.

 

 

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