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  • Super-resolution image of nuclear pores (green) and active chromatin (red). © Institut Pasteur

    Research | 06.03.2015

    Interactions between the nuclear pore and chromatin are critical for HIV-1 replication

    Little is understood about the molecular mechanisms that actually enable the HIV to integrate its genetic material into certain regions of the human genome. The scientists were able to find this link and determine the role played by the chromatin environment and nuclear pores in the replication of HIV-1.

  • Intercellular bridge between two daughter cells before cleavage. © Institut Pasteur

    Research | 05.03.2015

    The "dream" of every cell is to become two cells

    Arnaud Echard (head of the Membrane Traffic and Cell Division Lab) and his team are working to understand how a parent cell physically "cleaves" itself in two to create two distinct daughter cells. The researchers revealed that intercellular bridges split and in doing so release a structure called "midbody remnant" (MBR) into the extracellular environment. This discovery could have a significant impact on cancer research, as the presence of MBR is thought to promote the uncontrolled production of tumor cells.

  • SFB attached directly to the intestinal epithelial cells. Segmented filamentous bacteria, partners in intestinal immunity, finally cultured in vitro. © Institut Pasteur and Institut Imagine

    Research | 19.01.2015

    Segmented filamentous bacteria, partners in intestinal immunity, finally cultured in vitro

    Despite the vital role of segmented filamentous bacteria in establishing gut immune homeostasis in vivo in mice, scientists, for the past 50 years, have been unable to reproduce this symbiosis in vitro to shed light on the cellular and molecular interactions involved. Now, scientists have successfully cultured and reproduced the complex life-cycle of these bacteria outside their host for the first time.

  • Hepatic macrophage (in green) ingesting by phagocytosis pathogenic bacterium Listeria monocytogenes (in red). © Institut Pasteur

    Research | 09.01.2015

    Resident and recruited macrophages orchestrate the liver's defense against infection

    Scientists have demonstrated that liver-resident macrophages are rapidly killed by the pathogenic bacterium Listeria monocytogenes. This early death triggers the recruitment of macrophages from the bloodstream to the liver. These macrophages start by bringing the bacterial infection under control; then, in an unexpected development, they actually replace the liver-resident macrophages that have been killed by the infection.

  • A lymphocyte infected by HIV and transmission of the virus to neighboring cells © Institut Pasteur

    Research | 27.11.2014

    Defense mechanism against HIV-1 revealed

    Scientists have discovered how some of these restriction factors inhibit HIV replication in lymphocytes. These proteins belong to the IFITM (interferon-induced transmembrane proteins) family; they are broad-spectrum antiviral proteins that act on a wide range of viruses including influenza, dengue, etc. Little was previously known about their effect on HIV-1.

  • intestinal immunity, © Institut Pasteur

    Research | 07.11.2014

    A better understanding of the intestinal immunity

    The innate lymphoid cells contribute to immune defense by maintaining the integrity of the intestinal barrier. ILC are made in the bone marrow but must find their way to the gut mucosa where they perform their function. Scientists have discovered how this migration process is regulated.

  • Virus Ebola, Blood Ebola survivors tested as short-term treatment option, Institut Pasteur

    Research | 23.10.2014

    Blood Ebola survivors tested as short-term treatment option

    An international research consortium will assess whether treatment with antibodies in the blood of Ebola survivors could help infected patients to fight off the disease. If proven effective, this straightforward intervention could be scaled up in the short term and provide an urgently needed treatment option for patients in West Africa.

  • A new mechanism of gene regulation in Listeria, Listeria invading an epithelial cell, © Institut Pasteur

    Research | 22.08.2014

    A new mechanism of gene regulation in Listeria

    How do bacteria perceive their environment? How do they find and detect nutrients? How do they eat? In an article published in the journal Science, researchers reveal a new system of gene regulation in Listeria monocytogenes, the bacteria in food and responsible for listeriosis.

  • Section of Mycobacterium bovis © Institut Pasteur/Antoinette Ryter

    Research | 22.07.2014

    TB transmission: Why tubercle bacilli of animal origin don't spread within human populations

    Researchers examined the mechanisms involved in tuberculosis (TB) transmission to explain why tubercle bacilli of animal origin don't spread within human populations. Their work opens up new possibilities for understanding the functions and mechanisms involved in TB transmission in humans and could eventually lead to therapeutic solutions for preventing the spread of this infectious agent.

     

  • Well of Banizoumbou village, Niger, Assessing the effectiveness of anti-malaria campaigns, © Institut Pasteur

    Research | 01.07.2014

    Assessing the effectiveness of anti-malaria campaigns

    The fight against malaria has been declared a Millennium Development Goal by the World Health Organization, and as such receives significant worldwide funding. Despite this fact, the public health agencies that manage this program lack the means to assess whether campaigns are effectively able to reduce or eliminate malaria within individual countries.

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The Pasteur Museum is located at the Institut Pasteur, situated at: 25 rue du Docteur Roux 75015 Paris, France
 

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