Research

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  • Research | 29.06.2014

    EBOLA: Institut Pasteur in the front line against Ebola outbreak

     

    An international team of scientists from Institut Pasteur Paris and Dakar are on the front of the outbreak in Guinea. 

     

    The Institut Pasteur confirmed the outbreak on March 21, 2014. Since the outbreak is still continuing, scientists and materials have been sent from Institut Pasteur Paris and Dakar to Guinea. 

    Experts from Institut Pasteur Dakar are investigating new cases in Conackry. Scientists from the Emerging viral infection unit (UBIVE) have supported the European Mobile Lab (EMLab) in Gueckedou (Guinea). 
     
    The Institut Pasteur will attend the international emergency meeting organized in Ghana by WHO 2&3 July to reinforce the international response to the spread of the disease.

    This meeting will be attended by Health Ministers from 11 countries - Guinea, Liberia, Sierra Leone, Côte d'Ivoire, Democratic Republic of Congo, Gambia, Ghana, Guinea-Bissau, Mali, Senegal and Uganda - and different partners of the organization involved in the response to the outbreak of Ebola including representatives from MSF, Institut Pasteur and the European Union.

     

  • Scientists discover a novel mechanism in the development of pre-eclampsia © Institut Pasteur

    Research | 23.06.2014

    Scientists discover a novel mechanism in the development of pre-eclampsia

    No treatment currently exists for pre-eclampsia, a gestational disorder which affects over 8 million pregnant women worldwide and can cause premature delivery or death of the mother or the fetus.

  • Well of Banizoumbou village, Niger, Assessing the effectiveness of anti-malaria campaigns, © Institut Pasteur

    Research | 01.07.2014

    Assessing the effectiveness of anti-malaria campaigns

    The fight against malaria has been declared a Millennium Development Goal by the World Health Organization, and as such receives significant worldwide funding. Despite this fact, the public health agencies that manage this program lack the means to assess whether campaigns are effectively able to reduce or eliminate malaria within individual countries.

  • Colonization of brain vessels by N. meningitidis

    Research | 02.06.2014

    Elucidating the pathogenic mechanism of meningococcal meningitis

    Neisseria meningitidis, also called meningococcus, is a bacterium responsible for meningitis and septicemia. Its most serious form, purpura fulminans, is often fatal. This bacterium, which is naturally present in humans in the nasopharynx, is pathogenic if it reaches the blood stream. Scientists have deciphered the molecular events through which meningococci target blood vessels and colonize them. This work opens a path to new therapeutic perspectives for treating vascular problems caused by this type of invasive infection.

     

  • Chikungunya raises concern in the Americas

    Research | 10.04.2014

    Chikungunya raises concern in the Americas

     

    10.04.2014 - Despite the presence of potentially susceptible mosquitoes, the first autochthonous cases of chikungunya on the American continent were not reported until December 2013 when a severe epidemic struck the West Indies. 

  • Research | 11.03.2014

    Inauguration of a Regional Platform of Research on transmissible and emerging infectious diseases in Southeast Asia (PRR-Asia)

    Southeast Asia (SEA) is affected by emerging infectious diseases, and emerging outbreaks challenge the medical and scientific communities. The emergence of new diseases or their resistance to anti-microbial drugs in SEA is a complex mechanism which requires more interest on the diseases, on the condition of their emergence and on the diffusion of the causative agents. The study of infection transmitted or not by animals or arthropod vectors involves a new interdisciplinary approach with systemic and transversal collaborations between teams and institutions on priority programs integrated into a global health international strategy.

    The implementation of a Regional Platform of Research-Asia (PRR-Asia) in the campus of Institute Pasteur in Cambodia (IPC) will offer a unique opportunity for research teams from the North and the South to share their regional and international expertise and to develop strong partnerships through multi-sectoral research programs complementary to ongoing research on infectious diseases in relation with IPC and its partners.

  • Research | 17.01.2014

    A new bacterial mechanism for evading the immune system

    A team of scientists from the Institut Pasteur, the CNRS and Paris Diderot University has identified a new regulation mechanism that enables a pathogenic bacterium of the Streptococcus genus to rapidly adapt to its host. This study was published on January 16, 2014 in PLoS Pathogens. The mechanism in question enables the bacterium to minimize its exposure to the immune system while maintaining effective tissue colonization. This work was carried out on Streptococcus gallolyticus, an intestinal tract bacterium responsible for endocarditis and septicemia in the elderly.

  • Research | 28.11.2013

    Clinical trial launched to treat Sanfilippo B syndrome using gene therapy

    A phase I/II gene therapy clinical trial for children suffering from Sanfilippo B syndrome, a rare genetic disease, enrolled a first patient in October of this year. The trial is being carried out and coordinated by the Institut Pasteur (the trial’s sponsor), Inserm, AFM-Téléthon and Vaincre les Maladies Lysosomales (VML). It is being conducted at Bicêtre Hospital (AP-HP) in Paris. If the treatment is successful it will pave the way towards the development of other gene therapy treatments using the same process.

  • Research | 29.05.2013

    Worldwide Outbreak of Highly Antibiotic-Resistant Salmonella Risks Spreading to European Poultry Farms

    In a study published online May 28th for the Lancet Infectious Diseases medical journal, scientists at the Institut Pasteur in Paris and the Institut Pasteur in Morocco once again bring attention to the rapid worldwide spread of Salmonella Kentucky (S. Kentucky), a bacterium showing resistance to several classes of antibiotics. S. Kentucky is responsible for foodborne infections and has spread at an astonishing rate throughout Africa and the Middle East in the space of only a few years. In this study, the authors note that the bacterium has recently spread to India and South-East Asia and has acquired new resistance, particularly resistance to antibiotics of “last resort”. The scientists also point out the considerable risk of this multi-resistant strain spreading to farmed poultry in industrialized countries. This bacterium has already been detected in farmed turkeys in Europe.

  • Research | 02.08.2013

    Dengue: identifying mosquito genetic factors that control virus transmission

    Dengue is currently the most common insect-borne viral disease of humans worldwide. Scientists from the Institut Pasteur, the French National Center for Scientific Research (CNRS), and the Armed Forces Research Institute of Medical Sciences (AFRIMS) have discovered several genetic factors controlling the transmission of various dengue virus strains in a natural population of mosquitoes in Thailand. Their results indicate that the transmission of these viruses in nature depends not only on mosquito genetic factors but also on their specific interaction with viral genetic factors. This discovery significantly advances our understanding of dengue biology in nature. From a more general standpoint, this study also refines our view of the genetic basis of host-pathogen interactions. This work was published August 1st, 2013 on the PLoS Genetics website.

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